IMV just completed its second year of asking radiologists, technicians, administrators, and others involved in the use and purchasing of diagnostic imaging equipment and have published the results in Benchmarking For 2020 Diagnostic Imaging Equipment Customer Experience. We’ve studied 12 different manufacturers to better understand how they are delivering on their customer experience, and what areas manufacturers have room to improve in. Here we share the top five factors that customers have identified as being most important to their overall experience with manufacturers of diagnostic imaging equipment.

Read more

Over the past decade, the continuing development of fixed C-arm technology and clinical innovations have been shaping how fixed C-arms are used, and the distinction between the traditional cardiac cath lab vs. interventional radiology (IR) lab has become blurred. Such equipment can be installed, not only in radiology-related departments (e.g., radiology, imaging, interventional radiology, special procedures, angiography labs), and cardiology-related departments (e.g., cath labs, cardiology, cardiovascular, vascular, endovascular, electrophysiology labs), and but also in surgery-related departments (e.g., hybrid OR, surgery departments), with multiple physician specialties having access to the labs.

Read more

Procedure volume in the PET market hit the highest level ever in the U.S. in 2018, with adoption of PET/CT scanners mainly responsible for driving growth. The market could have grown even faster, were it not for a number of government policies over the last few years that have acted to slow down growth.

An estimated 2,086,000 clinical PET scans were performed in 2,370 U.S. hospital and nonhospital sites using fixed PET imaging systems or mobile PET services, according to IMV’s newly published “2019 PET Imaging Market Summary Report.” Compared with an estimated 1,945,000 PET scans performed in 2017, total PET scans increased 7% in 2018, representing the highest level of PET scan volume to date in the U.S.

Read more

In the 1980s, CT and MR scanners revolutionized the imaging industry by generating images digitally rather than using analog/film-based technology. Since then, radiology/imaging departments have progressed to being almost fully digitally based, with the large installed base of general radiography units being the last frontier. Due to the need for relatively large imaging plates to image large body parts in a single view, such as the chest, the image quality of the digital technology had to be perfected by industry and proven to the radiology community.

Read more